Reports

May 8, 2024

Delivering the Promise: A framework and action plan for a prosperity-driven immigration system for Canada

Canada has benefited tremendously from immigration. At its core, the promise of immigration is that people can come here from around the world, contribute to our economy and society, build a great life for themselves, and that collectively we will all be better off.

However, challenges such as surging population growth and weak economic growth are weighing down the system and cracks have emerged—and the promise of immigration is now at risk.

What Canada needs is a clear vision and plan for economic growth through immigration.

Delivering the Promise: A Framework and Action Plan for a Prosperity-Driven Immigration System for Canada is a clear vision and plan for an improved immigration system that can generate better economic growth and settlement outcomes—that improves prosperity for everyone.

The report suggests a framework and a series of recommendations to develop an immigration strategy that builds a strong economy, improves living standards, and leaves newcomers, businesses, and all Canadians with more opportunity. The report’s recommendations centre on three key themes:

  • Attract: Making Canada the top destination for prospective economic immigrants
  • Select: Selecting immigrants with the highest economic potential
  • Support: Helping newcomers successfully integrate into life in Canada

This framework and recommendations were shaped and guided by an Executive Task Force of Council members and informed by newcomer-serving agencies, policymakers, economists, academics, and newcomers themselves.

Background

Between 2024 and 2026 Canada is expected to welcome 1.5 million new residents, as part of the federal government’s goal to increase immigration targets. The stated purpose of this increase is economic: newcomers will fill labour shortages to grow the economy and help support an aging population.

With the federal government’s new targets, immigration will account for nearly all of Canada’s population growth and all the workforce growth between now and 2036. That means that almost 30% of the population and 37% of the workforce will be immigrants.

While immigration will certainly help make Canada’s economy bigger, it will not necessarily or automatically make Canadians wealthier. Projections show that while Canada is expected to see very tepid economic growth, it will lag in economic growth per capita. And with additional cracks in the system, urgent changes are needed to ensure immigration remains a source of strength and growth for Canada.

Explore more in our Prosperity-Driven Immigration for Canada project here.

 

Share This